Official NYFEA Press Release | Agriculture’s Promise 2010: Making Friends in DC

April 27, 2010 at 7:45 pm 2 comments

PRESS STATEMENT

April 28, 2010

www.agriculturespromise.com

Agriculture’s Promise 2010: Making Friends in DC

The 2010 Agriculture’s Promise conference was a huge success. Held at the Gaylord National Resort in Washington DC, the attendees, from California, Pennsylvania, Alabama and across the nation, experienced two days of unique insight into the nation’s agricultural policy. They had a visit from Michael Scuse, the Deputy Under Secretary of Agriculture at USDA. They heard from Chuck Conner, the CEO of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, and John Hays, Vice President for National Programs at The Farm Credit Council. The group learned how to be effective advocates from the past winners of the NYFEA Ag Communications Award. Further, there was interaction with members of Congress and their staffers. This was highlighted by a special briefing by Congressman Mike Rogers (a member of the House Agricultural Committee).

The group had the chance to interact with fellow attendees and even produced 5 Key Points that were put on handouts and delivered to Congress. The idea was simply to start reminding Congress that attendees from the beginning farmer and young agriculturalists sectors are important to the nation’s future.

5 Key Points for Agriculture’s Next Generation

1. Congress and USDA should support organizations that tell agriculture’s story.

Why is it important?

-The average age of the American farmer increases every year. Encouraging a younger generation of farmers to start producing food and fiber for America will be vital to the future of our country.

– The American consumer wants to know the source of their food. Educational programs are critical.

2. Public policy should balance agricultural production with environmental protection and energy independence

Why is it important? Farmers are the first environmentalists. Without a pristine environment, agricultural production will suffer. With the emphasis on energy independence, American agriculture can play a vital role in providing resources. The beginning producer is creative in markets and production but new products require funding and support.

3. Congress should assist new farmers as they transition into production agriculture.

Why is it important? The next generation of farmers must be able to start producing without the heavy tax burden that might force them to give up portions of their farm.

4. Policy should be designed to continue federal funding for agricultural-based education programs.

Why is it important? The next generation must be equipped with the technical, scientific, and communications skills to produce and market tomorrow’s agricultural goods.

5. Congress should adopt a Farm Bill that promotes the marketing of agricultural products

Why is it important? The next generation must be competitive in the world market.

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Entry filed under: Agriculture's Promise 2010, NYFEA info, Uncategorized.

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2 Comments Add your own

  • […] part of that procedure.  The participants then brainstormed to compile a list of their priorities (found here).  Tuesday the participants took their newly defined message to Capitol Hill and shared it with […]

    Reply
  • 2. A note on Agriculture’s Promise  |  April 10, 2011 at 9:34 pm

    […] part of that procedure.  The participants then brainstormed to compile a list of their priorities (found here).  Tuesday the participants took their newly defined message to Capitol Hill and shared it with […]

    Reply

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